When you need a load and there’s no data!

I hate when that happens. So, I try to research a powder with respect to tht caliber and bullet weight. Some companies do a very fine job of providing data like Western Powders. I have the Hornady, Sierra, Lee, and Lyman manuals. I also check the powder companies for their recipes. I think that this is just part of the fun of the reloading process. Then I make my choices.

I just recently purchased some Western Powders and the Ramshot manual is recently comprehensive of bullet types, weights and powder types. Also, reading a variety of articles on the internet about reloading includes many recipes and gives you a glimpse of preferred powders for specific calibers and bullet weights. Information, is so prevalent and available today, unlike 10 or 15 years ago. It is incumbent upon us to do our homework with all of the information that is available today.
 

walterbunning

Administrator
I hate when that happens. So, I try to research a powder with respect to tht caliber and bullet weight. Some companies do a very fine job of providing data like Western Powders. I have the Hornady, Sierra, Lee, and Lyman manuals. I also check the powder companies for their recipes. I think that this is just part of the fun of the reloading process. Then I make my choices.

I just recently purchased some Western Powders and the Ramshot manual is recently comprehensive of bullet types, weights and powder types. Also, reading a variety of articles on the internet about reloading includes many recipes and gives you a glimpse of preferred powders for specific calibers and bullet weights. Information, is so prevalent and available today, unlike 10 or 15 years ago. It is incumbent upon us to do our homework with all of the information that is available today.
I have all the manuals, trust me. When you shoot a lot of legacy cartridges like I do, such as .44 Russian, .38 Short and Long Colt, .45 Scholfield..there just isn’t much there for using them with jacketed or plated bullets.
 
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