Suggested ammo for Ar15 build

The most popular is 55 and 62 grain bullets. For self defense, you would be looking for a non-full metal jacket bullet. Something in a soft point should work. Keep in mind that each rifle is different, even in factory built rifles of the same model. What mine may shoot sub minute of angle, yours may shoot poorly.

So, start with one of the weights above and try different brands to see what groups best. Then try the other weight and do the same. Then you can figure out what to focus on. Your rifle might like something heavier or lighter as well. Only one way to find out. Buy a box and shoot it.

Don’t zero the rifle, just make sure it hits the paper and see what gets you the smallest group size. Once you figure that out, you can zero your rifle.
 
The most popular is 55 and 62 grain bullets. For self defense, you would be looking for a non-full metal jacket bullet. Something in a soft point should work. Keep in mind that each rifle is different, even in factory built rifles of the same model. What mine may shoot sub minute of angle, yours may shoot poorly.

So, start with one of the weights above and try different brands to see what groups best. Then try the other weight and do the same. Then you can figure out what to focus on. Your rifle might like something heavier or lighter as well. Only one way to find out. Buy a box and shoot it.

Don’t zero the rifle, just make sure it hits the paper and see what gets you the smallest group size. Once you figure that out, you can zero your rifle.
Thank you sgtsandman I was looking for something to start with hopefully in the future I will be rolling my own.
 
Thank you sgtsandman I was looking for something to start with hopefully in the future I will be rolling my own.
Well, once you find what your rifle likes, it will give you some of an idea what components you will need. Especially if you can find the component list the manufacturer used for that round. My 7.62 MVP Patrol loves Remington Premier Match ammunition. Finding it some times can be tough. Federal makes a similar cartridge with the same Sierra bullets but doesn't shoot as accurately. I need to find out what Remington is using!
 
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Well, once you find what your rifle likes, it will give you some of an idea what components you will need. Especially if you can find the component list the manufacturer used for that round. My 7.62 MVP Patrol loves Remington Premier Match ammunition. Finding it some times can be tough. Federal makes a similar cartridge with the same Sierra bullets but doesn't shoot as accurately. I need to find out what Remington is using!
It's got to be a primer powder combination they're using that's giving you the accuracy that you like. The M16 AR-15 platform was designed originally with extruded stick powder. To limit the fluctuation in pressure and velocity in extreme weather changes. Southeast Asia gets very hot and humid and ball powder can give you some fluctuations in velocity and pressure under those conditions. I live in Florida so I stick with the extruded powder. That's what I would suggest for powder Thor bullets there so many now I could go on for days. If you want moderately-priced go with Sierra. You can also order from some bullet manufacturers a demo pack which will give you like 25 rounds for a discounted price so that you can try them out and see if your Barrel likes them. Hope it helps a little bit.
 
It's got to be a primer powder combination they're using that's giving you the accuracy that you like. The M16 AR-15 platform was designed originally with extruded stick powder. To limit the fluctuation in pressure and velocity in extreme weather changes. Southeast Asia gets very hot and humid and ball powder can give you some fluctuations in velocity and pressure under those conditions. I live in Florida so I stick with the extruded powder. That's what I would suggest for powder Thor bullets there so many now I could go on for days. If you want moderately-priced go with Sierra. You can also order from some bullet manufacturers a demo pack which will give you like 25 rounds for a discounted price so that you can try them out and see if your Barrel likes them. Hope it helps a little bit.
In PA, re run the gamut on weather, so never know what kind of conditions we might have. I figured it was either a power difference or a primer and powder difference. I just need to find out what they are. I might have to sacrifice a cartridge to take a look at what is inside. I'm not sure once can identify the primer once it's out of the case they come in but narrowing down the power and weight charged would be great.
 
You’ll also want to take into consideration twist rate and barrel length. Fast twist (1:7) will like a heavier bullet. My A3 clone shoots 55gr ok but it really likes 75 gr PP match and 77gr SMK with TAC. 1:9 will like lighter and 1:8 is middle ground.
Johnny’s reloading bench on YT did an extensive search to duplicate Mk262 (Black Hills 5.56) for accuracy and velocity. Powder type, primer make and weather all had influence.
 
Hi Blueheller, Sgt Sandman has done a good job at covering it. The key is your barrel twist, as to what grain bullet to shoot. Try several brands to see what shoots best out of your , Hornady Black, 55 grain or other Hornady ammo from 55 -75 grain, Blackhills 55-77 grain ammo, Federal 55-77 grain, your choice is endless. Best part is to enjoy learning about your rifle! Hope this helps.
 
I would like to second Steve. PSA barrels are 1:7 twist. I have good luck with 77 grain bullets. I have not rolled my own yet, but my factory loads give me 1moa out to 300 yards. Given I have a 20 powered scope mounted but 1moa none the least. I have 3 1:7 barrels that are consistent with accuracy W/77. Your mileage may vary.

I would suggest getting a mix of brands and weights and running 5 shot groups of each. What ever weight works the Best Buy those projectiles and work a load from a published data source.

Enjoy the PSA AR. I have many and love them all.
 
I think this would be a great way to go.


Highboy
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Not a bad way to go at all, Especially for self-defense up close. A 30 cal projectile would do the trick. Aside from 762x39 ballistics you get to use reg ar mags. Heck, I never considered 300 before.

Worth a look for myself indeed.
 
Not a bad way to go at all, Especially for self-defense up close. A 30 cal projectile would do the trick. Aside from 762x39 ballistics you get to use reg ar mags. Heck, I never considered 300 before.

Worth a look for myself indeed.
The 300 blkout is a great intermediate cartridge. Good "100-150" yard" round. Great option for home defense. Works on deer and hogs. For hunting, the key is to keep it in 100-125 yards for effective terminal ballistics.

This PSA kit looks like a good way to go if your still on the fence concerning the 300 Blkout. Just add your favorite brand lower. Low cost alternative to purchasing a completed carbine. If you live in a free state, you could build a pistol version (7-12 inch barrel) and have a great home defense or truck gun.

1. What I like about the 300 Blkout is it uses 30 caliber bullets, 110-240 grain. So if you load for 308/30-06 your covered.

2. Good round for home defense in the 110-220 grain loads, supersonic or subsonic loads, if your concerned about over penetration. Most shootings occur between 7-15 yards.

3. The ability to convert 223/5.56 brass to 300 Blkout.

4. Simple to convert a carbine in 223/5.56, just swap out the barrel and muzzle device to 30 caliber. Use your same bolt carrier group. You can use your magazines (10 round magazine capacity is the law here in Commiefornia). For those who reside in free states 30 round 300 blkout mags by Magpul (pmags) are very reliable.

Buy the kit, build it, Load magazines and have fun! The 300 blkout carbine, will soon become a favorite range gun!

Have a great day!
 
I agree with the 300bo. Those pesky 65 grain bullets fliying around the neighborhood at3000 ft/s can get you in trouble. That’s why i keep the ak under the pillow. Ar 9 is a blast too, but that’s a complete build opposed to just an upper swap.
 
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