Hornady Concentricity Gauge Video

walterbunning

Administrator
I have that tool as well, and use it to check my .223 rounds. I don’t use the bullet straightening feature, though, as I feel that the torque it applies to the bullet upsets neck tension in the rounds that I feed my bolt rifle, which I don’t crimp. The AR rounds get crimped, so the neck tension thing is not as much a factor. Otherwise, it’s a nice tool and gives you a good idea as to how good of a seating job your die does. I use a Forster seater, and it is quite good. Nice video, by the way!
 
I understand what you are doing an why. My question is the bullets themselves and manufacture. Are they made well enough that one could theoretically have no measurable run out or is there always going to be some run out due to imperfections in the bullet itself? Meaning the core might be slightly out of round or the copper jacket being slightly thinker in some spots?
 
I think there is likely to always be some run out. I have some combinations that run almost no run out and some that have a little (.001" to .0015"). And some have a bit more then that. It is always a combination of the components and of the reloading equipment. I try to match my rounds to the purpose of the cartridges. Benchrest shooters would not tolerate .002" runout. Those would be fouling rounds. I am not a benchrest shooter, so........bottom line is I don't think that most bullets are super consistent.
 

AR Precision

Moderator
Staff member
I have that tool as well, and use it to check my .223 rounds. I don’t use the bullet straightening feature, though, as I feel that the torque it applies to the bullet upsets neck tension in the rounds that I feed my bolt rifle, which I don’t crimp. The AR rounds get crimped, so the neck tension thing is not as much a factor. Otherwise, it’s a nice tool and gives you a good idea as to how good of a seating job your die does. I use a Forster seater, and it is quite good. Nice video, by the way!
I have that tool as well, and use it to check my .223 rounds. I don’t use the bullet straightening feature, though, as I feel that the torque it applies to the bullet upsets neck tension in the rounds that I feed my bolt rifle, which I don’t crimp. The AR rounds get crimped, so the neck tension thing is not as much a factor. Otherwise, it’s a nice tool and gives you a good idea as to how good of a seating job your die does. I use a Forster seater, and it is quite good. Nice video, by the way!
Walter I used a Forster micro seater on that one in the video too. It seems to keep run out to a min.
 

AR Precision

Moderator
Staff member
I think there is likely to always be some run out. I have some combinations that run almost no run out and some that have a little (.001" to .0015"). And some have a bit more then that. It is always a combination of the components and of the reloading equipment. I try to match my rounds to the purpose of the cartridges. Benchrest shooters would not tolerate .002" run out. Those would be fouling rounds. I am not a benchrest shooter, so........bottom line is I don't think that most bullets are super consistent.
I can get almost zero to half a thousand on my 223 and 308. And i can adjust run out to almost 0 run out with the Hornady. Sierra bullets are very high quality.
I don't like two thou run out on my 308 and get the run out down to one thou or less.
 

AR Precision

Moderator
Staff member
I understand what you are doing an why. My question is the bullets themselves and manufacture. Are they made well enough that one could theoretically have no measurable run out or is there always going to be some run out due to imperfections in the bullet itself? Meaning the core might be slightly out of round or the copper jacket being slightly thinker in some spots?
If you have a high quality bullet like Sierra it will have almost no run out with precision dies and seaters being used. So it does depend on which bullet manufacture you choose. Hornady makes some good bullets also! Yes some i suppose could have miner thickness, just the nature of manufacturing tolerances.
 

AR Precision

Moderator
Staff member
I think there is likely to always be some run out. I have some combinations that run almost no run out and some that have a little (.001" to .0015"). And some have a bit more then that. It is always a combination of the components and of the reloading equipment. I try to match my rounds to the purpose of the cartridges. Benchrest shooters would not tolerate .002" runout. Those would be fouling rounds. I am not a benchrest shooter, so........bottom line is I don't think that most bullets are super consistent.
Sierra has very good consistency and quality with their Match Grade line. And of course some other manufactures do also.
 

AR Precision

Moderator
Staff member
I understand what you are doing an why. My question is the bullets themselves and manufacture. Are they made well enough that one could theoretically have no measurable run out or is there always going to be some run out due to imperfections in the bullet itself? Meaning the core might be slightly out of round or the copper jacket being slightly thinker in some spots?
With Sierra match grade they have very little to almost no run out. I'm sure there are others made to a high quality. So yes they are made that good. You could run into some in the lot that are not as tight but they will still be match grade. The bullet you see in the video it is just a off label Hornady 223 soft point round and it measures like a match grade Sierra bullet.
 
I believe what you guys are saying is very true. Just match the set up, components, and procedures to the end goal of the cartridge. You can have a lot of fun being precise for some applications and not being so picky for plinking.
 
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